Friday, August 1, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Crocodile Listens’

Having fun with scale!

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

One of the things I talk about a lot in presentations is scale. Here’s a fun art project to look at crocodile scale. Oh, and the food is not for the crocodile. The Hamilton students were collecting food for the hungry. They were stacking around the length of the building in order to reach their goal. 

 

 

Crocodile in full scale!

Crocodile in full scale!

Language fun with Crocodile Listens and the chant books

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

This amazing teacher worked with her students to put together a Thanksgiving-appropriate story using the structure of Crocodile Listens. See what happens when turkey listens!

They also created a turkey chant using the chant books as a structural element.  Mrs Schwartz is clearly an extraordinary teacher.

Life Cycles

Wednesday, September 10th, 2008

Let’s learn about life cycles. How does a toad survive in the desert? Let’s find out.

Another animal lays eggs in sand, too-not in the desert, but on a beach. The mother animal weighs as much as a refrigerator full of food. Can you guess the animal?

Sea turtle mothers lay their eggs and leave them. The hatchlings must fend for themselves. But another kind of creature guards its eggs and the hatchlings.

Another has to begin the year by finding a home and building a colony.

 

And here is an animal family with a parent who takes protecting the young very seriously!

Honk, Honk, Goose

Crocodile Listens art

Tuesday, September 9th, 2008

Harrison School, South Bend

The Senses: Looking and Listening

Tuesday, July 17th, 2007

After reading the book, students can learn observation skills by going out and looking for shadows and experimenting as the kids do in the book. Why are shadows hard to see when the sky is cloudy?

 

After reading some of these books, students can listen carefully, and write down the sounds they hear in their environment. Have older students use stopwatches and write down what they hear at each 30 second mark. Cars? Planes? Pencils? Voices? Scientists use these kinds of observations, called data, in their studies. Are certain sounds heard more often than others?

Continents and Crocodiles

Sunday, September 17th, 2006

Use Sayre’s continent books or maps to introduce the continent of Africa.

Then introduce some African animals with the books below. 

First, survey the kids about what they know about crocodiles and think about crocodiles: Do you like crocodiles? How would you describe a crocodile? Pay attention to the adjectives they use and write a few down on a chalkboard.

Now look back at the adjectives we used for crocodiles before we read the book. Did you learn anything new about crocodiles? How would you describe them now? Let’s learn about some more African animals.

If You Should Hear a Honey Guide contains a Swahili word: Kumbe! Check the web or other books for more Swahili words to introduce to the kids. Educators might also transition to more information on the people of Africa.

About Me
April Sayre

April Pulley Sayre is an award-winning children’s book author of over 55 natural history books for children and adults. Her read-aloud nonfiction books, known for their lyricism and scientific precision, have been translated into French, Dutch, Japanese, and Korean. She is best known for pioneering literary ways to immerse young readers in natural events via creative storytelling and unusual perspectives.

Learn more…



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