Monday, September 1, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘The Bumblebee Queen’

New Bumblebee Publication

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Kids and educators intrigued by my book The Bumblebee Queen, there’s finally a truly great publication I can send you to for follow up. This has been on my wish-some-expert-would-write-this dream list for years. Hooray for USDA and all the authors involved! Fisheries biologist John Magee in NH, thanks for giving me the heads up on it.

The publication is a free, downloadable pdf, you can store it on your computer, ipad, iphone, whatever.

http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/documents/BumbleBeeGuide2011.pdf

Bumblebee Poetry and Nonfiction Writing at Midway Elem

Sunday, March 29th, 2009

Read The Bumblebee Queen. Pull out the chewiest, most evocative vocabulary and put it on sticky notes. Then move around the words to make a poem of your own.
(more…)

Bumblebee Math

Friday, November 7th, 2008

Here are some ideas, sketched out, for what educators might do with the book, THE BUMBLEBEE QUEEN. 

 

 

BUMBLEBEE MATH 

(A mathematical look at The Bumblebee Queen by April Pulley Sayre) 

 

BEING A MATH DETECTIVE

(Building number literacy and sensitivity) 

 

After a first read of the book, as a story, look through it again, as a math detective.

Math can help you notice things and connect facts that you see.  (more…)

Bumblebee Queen Math

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

For a teacher’s workshop recently, I was asked to share some ideas about using THE BUMBLEBEE QUEEN (Charlesbridge) in the context of math. Below are some of my informal ideas. I’m sure they will spark lots more activities in educators out there. Let me know what you do!

 

BUMBLEBEE MATH 

(A mathematical look at The Bumblebee Queen by April Pulley Sayre) 

 

BEING A MATH DETECTIVE

(Building number literacy and sensitivity) 

After a first read of the book, as a story, look through it again, as a math detective.

Math can help you notice things and connect facts that you see. 

So let’s be math detectives

 

What to we notice about numbers in the book?

 

For younger students:

Let’s look through and write down what we see.

(Write down an honor various responses from kids counting.)

 

(On the cover, we see:

examples that may be suggested by students:)

 

three flowers on the left (columbine)

six legs on a bumblebee

two wings on a  bumblebee

Three petals on each flower. Three trillium. They are named “tri” for three.

 

(On the first full spread we see)

Six-sided snowflakes

Four-toed bird feet. 

One chamber where she lives

You could count the number of pieces of grass

You could count the number of trees.

 

Do you notice there are lots of things to count on each page?

There are many  numbers to notice on each page. 

Let’s try to narrow down what we count. 

Let’s stay as close as possible to the bee and her life.

What numbers that we hear or see are important to her life? 

Let’s read. 

 

For older students

1) Read the book and write down any numbers mentioned in the text.  If you find them in a sentence, write down the entire sentence.

One way to look for numbers would be to scan the pages quickly for number shapes.

Try that. Does this technique find all the numbers? Why or why not? 

(No. Some numbers may be spelled out in letters. So you will need to read, not just scan. 

Some numbers may not be spelled out. You may need to look for clues to those numbers in the illustrations.)

Answers: examples numbers students may have noted

250 bumblebee species

In 5 days, the eggs hatch. 

The larvae spin cocoons 10-14 days after hatching

In ten days, the cocoons ripen. (Bees emerge.>) 

A bumblebee colony can contain 30-400 bees

Three kinds of bees: queens, workers, drones

 

USING NUMBERS YOU HAVE GATHERED

CARDINAL NUMBERS/ ORDINAL NUMBERS

How many places did the bumblebee look before she found a place to build her colony?

By number, which place did she choose?

The 3rd place she looked. 

Pause to investigate ordinal/cardinal numbers

Cardinal number—a number denoting quantity  one, two, three, four five.

Ordinal number—a number denoting order 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th.

GENERATIONS

Take the figures you have gathered about the bumblebee’s life. Create a timeline, of the days of a bumblebee’s development. 

Bumblebee Queen Activities

Tuesday, September 9th, 2008

South Adams Elementary, near Decatur, IN

Thursday, September 4th, 2008

I had such fun at this school near Berne. Just look at a few images of what they did with ONE IS A SNAIL, THE BUMBLEBEE QUEEN, and PUT ON SOME ANTLERS AND WALK LIKE A MOOSE.

WOW!

Knox County, OH school visit activities. Wow!

Friday, March 7th, 2008

Wow, Knox County, OH schools had fun with my books!. What extraordinary teachers and students. The countryside near there is beautiful, too.

About Me
April Sayre

April Pulley Sayre is an award-winning children’s book author of over 55 natural history books for children and adults. Her read-aloud nonfiction books, known for their lyricism and scientific precision, have been translated into French, Dutch, Japanese, and Korean. She is best known for pioneering literary ways to immerse young readers in natural events via creative storytelling and unusual perspectives.

Learn more…



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